Showing posts with label agriculture. Show all posts
Showing posts with label agriculture. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

#Plant18 postponed due to cold & wet Spring

The 2018 planting season has been delayed due to the wet and cold weather across the Midwest. We have all our machinery ready to go but have not started due to wet field conditions. We expect to start in the next week or two as long as no more flooding occurs. If we try to plant too early, we may end up like the tractor below!

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Great Weather leads to successful Corn Planting Season

Five perfect days of weather has led to the successful season of corn planting for McKay Farms. We have made the switch now to soybeans and continue to work early mornings and late nights.We expect this week to bring us rain so it was great to finish corn so early in the season. Check out the picture above where Dan McKay is using the seed tinder to load up the corn planter as Rita McKay delivers lunch for the day.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

McKay Farms begins #Plant17 on April 19th

For the second consecutive year, McKay Farms begins the Planting Season on April 19th. An extremely mild February followed by a wet spring delayed the early planting season. We are excited to be back at work with over 100 acres planted in the first full day. 



Thursday, February 16, 2017

National Farm Machinery Show held in Louisville, KY

The 52nd National Farm Machinery Show and America's largest indoor farm show is being held in Louisville, Kentucky. Dan and Rita McKay attended the show to learn about the latest equipment, technologies and best practices. Do not forget to save the date for the Farm Progress Show 2017 held August 29-31 in Decatur, Illinois.


Thursday, January 26, 2017

Tyler McKay lobbies Politicians in DC

Mr. Tyler McKay spent the week meeting with Speaker Ryan (WI), Senator Ernst (IA), Senator Grassley (IA), Senator Daines (MT), new Ambassador to China Terry Branstad and new Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke. Discussions were focused on elimination of WOTUS, preservation of rural land, fair trade for farmers and the upcoming Farm Bill.
Ambassador to China Terry Branstad
Chairman of Judiciary Committee Chuck Grassley
Speaker of House Paul Ryan
Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke
Senator Joni Ernst

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

#Harvest16 for McKay Farms is finished!

After many long days of work and hard work by Dan McKay and his sons, we are proud to say #Harvest16 is successfully finished. Harvest makes Fall the best season of the year and allows the family to come together to accomplish one goal. We will now begin preparing for #Plant17 with soil testing, fall tillage and tractor maintenance.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Volunteers lend helping hands for injured farmer's harvest

NEWMAN — Dave Young is facing many adjustments after an accident in August left him blind in his right eye. At first with little depth perception, he was having problems with seemingly simple tasks such as putting toothpaste on a toothbrush. It took him a few days to be able to do that again. The hardest part for Young, a farmer in Douglas County, might be watching others in the fields this fall after years in the driver's seat of a combine. Unable to operate the equipment, Young, 59, wasn't sure how he was going to get this year's crop out of the fields. Luckily, a group of neighbors in the Newman area and others from across the county rallied to his aid, taking a day off from working their own fields last week to harvest Young's corn last week. “I've been stewing about it for a month,” Young said while still making phone calls to make sure the grain was delivered to nearby elevators. “This feels like a great big hug. It's a good feeling.” Tyler Harvey, the Douglas County Farm Bureau manager, found that everyone who heard about what Young needed was more than willing to help. Young was injured when a pry bar slipped, hitting his face while working on a semi-truck.

“All the time we think about wearing safety equipment using power tools, but hand tools can hurt just as bad,” Young said. “One little slip and I'm paying for it.” Harvey said 230 acres in five fields needed to be harvested, a task that normally takes several weeks. Instead, it got done in a day with the help of all the volunteers. “Seeing so many people come together, it takes the weight off,” Harvey said. “This is really what the agriculture community is like when there is a time of need. Once word got out, the help flowed in.” Dave Young's wife, Debby, was among the family members and neighbors helping to prepare sack lunches to take to the fields as a way to thank the volunteers. They even made sure an FS truck was available to replenish any fuel that the volunteers used for their equipment during the day. Debby Young said it's been a hard adjustment at a time of year when Dave is usually out in the fields for more than 12 hours a day, something she knows he'd rather be doing now.

“We can't express how much we appreciate the help,” Debby Young said. “Harvest is a stressful time in farming. This is when we get our pay day.” Family members have driven in from both nearby and out of state to help. They were impressed to see the show of support. “I drove in here and I was almost in tears when I saw all the guys lined up,” said Gerald Day of Monticello, Dave Young's father-in-law. Taking any time off during harvest can be a lot to ask as farmers want to complete the work as efficiently as possible, not knowing how weather conditions can change, Harvey said.
“It's always a race against the clock,” Harvey said. “One of the things about farming is being used to change.” Some of the neighboring farmers shrugged off what they were doing, saying it was just what they do. “We've got to help when somebody needs it,” said Greg Luth while preparing to hop back in a combine to finish off one of the fields. Harvey said after knowing Young through various Farm Bureau activities that he would do the same thing if somebody else needed the help. “I'm glad we could help out and coordinate this,” Harvey said. “It's easy to help somebody like him.” Harvey said a similar effort is likely to be needed to help with Young's soybean fields, but for the time being, the focus was on corn, which was ready to be harvested. Young isn't sure what the future will hold for his recovery, but he remains hopeful that he will be back in the fields for spring planting.


Monday, September 26, 2016

Great Start to Harvest 2016

The weather has been perfect over the past week allowing the family to begin operations on Harvest 2016. A busy and successful week of over 250 acres of corn shelled and contributions from the entire family. We will have a lot of pictures to share over the next coming weeks as Harvest season is here!


Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Plant 2016 is in full speed!

Spring is here and Planting Season has arrived! Rain has delayed the process some including over an inch last night throughout all of Central Illinois. We have over 80% of corn planted and praying for some sunshine to get back at work. Currently, 57% of corn in Illinois has been planted. Check out a few pictures from #Plant16.



Saturday, October 24, 2015

Cash rent changes for 2016

(Source: University of Illinois) Cash rents on professionally managed farmland likely will decrease for the 2016 cropping year. Rents on non-professionally managed farmland likely will decrease as well. However, projected rent decreases are not large enough to cause farmers to have positive returns in 2016 given current projections of commodity prices and costs. The lagged relationship between returns and cash rents still exists.

Each year, the Illinois Society of Professional Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers conducts a survey of its membership. In this survey, managers are asked the cash rent for the current year and expectations for next year. This survey provides a good indicator of rents on professionally managed farmland. Managers give averages and expectations for four classes of farmland productivity:
  • Excellent - expected corn yields over 190 bushels per acre
  • Good - Expected corn yields between 170 and 190 bushels per acre
  • Averages - expected corn yields between 150 and 170 bushels per acre
  • Fair - expected corn yields less than 150 bushels per acre
For excellent quality farmland, the average cash rent on professionally managed farmland was $374 per acre in 2014. Cash rents decreased to $350 per acre in 2015. Current expectations are for cash rents to continue the decrease in 2016. Expected rent in 2016 is $318 per acre, a $32 decrease from the 2015 level. Similar decreases are projected for all land classes:
  • Good quality farmland: a $28 per acre decrease to $267 per acre
  • Average quality farmland: a $31 decrease to $219 per acre
  • Fair quality farmland: a $23 decrease to $177 per acre
These professionally managed cash rents typically are higher than "average" cash rents, which include all farmland, the majority of which that is not professionally managed. In 2014, for example, excellent productivity farmland had an average cash rent of $293 per acre, $81 less than the $374 per acre for professionally managed farmland. While $293 per acre is the average, there is a large range in rents, with some rents considerably below average, just as there are rents above average.

Saturday, October 10, 2015

Harvest 2015 is Complete!

Nearly perfect weather throughout the months of September and October has allowed Harvest 2015 to finished at a record pace on October 3rd, 2015. Dan McKay and his sons worked day and night until the job was complete. We have to thank God for safety during the harvest season and for the beautiful weather to help deliver another successful harvest.
Working through the night

Jason McKay overlooking last load of corn for Harvest 2015